Isaiah 15/16 The Fall of Moab

Truly one of the odd prophecies delivered by Isaiah for several reasons.  Moab, the country grown from the ancestors of Lot was not a favored country for Israel.  Throughout its history, Moab was never friendly to Israel and, as Israel returned to occupy Canaan, Moab did not assist nor make peace with Israel.  While the struggle was on again/off again Israel was never allied with Moab.  

So, when reading the prophecy, Isaiah grieves the demise of Moab which is legitimate not sarcastic.  It is a prophecy with a time frame, 3 years. Moab was a wealth land.  Its people affluent–so the prophecy that they would be destroyed within a day is daunting. According to Isaiah the destruction would be complete, and the people left penniless and homeless. It is the relation to Israel and the possible destruction of Israel that caused Isaiah’s pain.

Isaiah was truly personally vested in his visions from the Lord.  In Isaiah 16, Isaiah even makes mention of the coming Messiah.  The destruction of Moab is a foretelling of the complete destruction of the region.  The point is that the destruction would pass.  Isaiah would find the promise in the destruction. The promise of a ruler that would establish a throne of peace.  Such a promise provided hope to Israel, to Moab, and to us.  No matter the depth of life, God’s promise is to restore and redeem His chosen. 

As part of that group, His chosen, we are called to follow him closely and trust Him completely.  In that journey, we will not always know what lies ahead.  What we can be sure of is that God is never surprised, nor is He ever out of control.  Like Isaiah, we must cling the promise and endure the trials.  In that, we will find peace and eternal life with Christ.

God Bless You


 A prophecy against Moab:

Ar in Moab is ruined,
    destroyed in a night!
Kir in Moab is ruined,
    destroyed in a night!
Dibon goes up to its temple,
    to its high places to weep;
    Moab wails over Nebo and Medeba.
Every head is shaved
    and every beard cut off.
In the streets they wear sackcloth;
    on the roofs and in the public squares
they all wail,
    prostrate with weeping.
Heshbon and Elealeh cry out,
    their voices are heard all the way to Jahaz.
Therefore the armed men of Moab cry out,
    and their hearts are faint.

My heart cries out over Moab;
    her fugitives flee as far as Zoar,
    as far as Eglath Shelishiyah.
They go up the hill to Luhith,
    weeping as they go;
on the road to Horonaim
    they lament their destruction.
The waters of Nimrim are dried up
    and the grass is withered;
the vegetation is gone
    and nothing green is left.
So the wealth they have acquired and stored up
    they carry away over the Ravine of the Poplars.
Their outcry echoes along the border of Moab;
    their wailing reaches as far as Eglaim,
    their lamentation as far as Beer Elim.
The waters of Dimon[a] are full of blood,
    but I will bring still more upon Dimon[b]
a lion upon the fugitives of Moab
    and upon those who remain in the land.

Send lambs as tribute
    to the ruler of the land,
from Sela, across the desert,
    to the mount of Daughter Zion.
Like fluttering birds
    pushed from the nest,
so are the women of Moab
    at the fords of the Arnon.

“Make up your mind,” Moab says.
    “Render a decision.
Make your shadow like night—
    at high noon.
Hide the fugitives,
    do not betray the refugees.
Let the Moabite fugitives stay with you;
    be their shelter from the destroyer.”

The oppressor will come to an end,
    and destruction will cease;
    the aggressor will vanish from the land.
In love a throne will be established;
    in faithfulness a man will sit on it—
    one from the house[a] of David—
one who in judging seeks justice
    and speeds the cause of righteousness.

This is the word the Lord has already spoken concerning Moab. 14 But now the Lord says: “Within three years, as a servant bound by contract would count them, Moab’s splendor and all her many people will be despised, and her survivors will be very few and feeble.”

Isaiah 11–Jesus, The Game Changer

In his delivery of the difficult message to God’s chosen people, Isaiah never seems to give a tough decree without the follow of great hope.  Isaiah had just finished describing the enslavement of the people to Assyria and to Egypt he also talked of the return of the remnant anf the destruction of Israel’s captors.  Then, from that, Isaiah stops and begins a description of the shoot from the branch of Jesse that restores and brings peace.  

In Isaiah’s description, The one that will restore will do so with peace, wisdom, and understanding. There will be no need to raise a sword because he will unify and protect His own.  He will bring peace accross all nations and will rule with wisdom and not with might. Sadly, the description is not the description of most rulers.  The Messiah was not sent to be a mighty tyrant or warrior king, He was sent to seek and to save that which was lost.

Looking back at the coming of the Lord, He truly divided time and taught peace and unity.  He changed the world by reminding us that to be first–one must get to the back of the line.  The great should act with the most humility, and the leaders should be the most selfless servants. 

Then and now, His people are to be the ones to lead the nations to a right knowledge of God and draw them to God not push them away.  Make no mistake, God is all knowing and all powerful. He brings up nations and then takes them down.  He allows men the ability to destroy themselves–but desires most to restore and unify them.  Jesus, the shoot of Jesse, waits to be the change agent; if we will simply trust and follow Him.  Let’s Pray for revival for ourselves, our families, and our nation.

God Bless You


A shoot will come up from the stump of Jesse;
    from his roots a Branch will bear fruit.
The Spirit of the Lord will rest on him—
    the Spirit of wisdom and of understanding,
    the Spirit of counsel and of might,
    the Spirit of the knowledge and fear of the Lord—
and he will delight in the fear of the Lord.

He will not judge by what he sees with his eyes,
    or decide by what he hears with his ears;
but with righteousness he will judge the needy,
    with justice he will give decisions for the poor of the earth.
He will strike the earth with the rod of his mouth;
    with the breath of his lips he will slay the wicked.
Righteousness will be his belt
    and faithfulness the sash around his waist.

The wolf will live with the lamb,
    the leopard will lie down with the goat,
the calf and the lion and the yearling[a] together;
    and a little child will lead them.
The cow will feed with the bear,
    their young will lie down together,
    and the lion will eat straw like the ox.
The infant will play near the cobra’s den,
    and the young child will put its hand into the viper’s nest.
They will neither harm nor destroy
    on all my holy mountain,
for the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the Lord
    as the waters cover the sea.

10 In that day the Root of Jesse will stand as a banner for the peoples; the nations will rally to him, and his resting place will be glorious. 

Isaiah 7 Great News for Now and Forever

Now that God had His man on the ground, He sent Isaiah and his Son (A remnant will return) to assure and encourage the King.  Three phrases carry the day–Be careful, keep calm and do not be afraid.  Ahaz had reason to be afraid, the 10 tribes–Ephriam and Assyria were poised to take Judah (Judah and Benjamin).

God makes it clear–“Not going to happen!”  What is more, the two enemies will be a distant memory. This was pretty good news for Ahaz–even though he was not following the Lord.  Fortunately for him, God honored his promise for David and on David’s behalf.  Isaiah knew that God was not fooling around and was able to give the message to the king. 

Tucked in this is another great message–Messianic prophecy 1–Judah will have an eternal reign.  Isaiah tells Ahaz that God Himself will seal His mark on history–A virgin will give birth to a son and his name will be Immanuel–God with Us.  Ahaz had no clue that this was a promise for eternity, surely if he had, he would have trusted God and followed God’s leadership.

Isaiah would lead four kings and try to give them a vision for the future of God’s chosen people.  Many of the messages would have immediate relevance, and many would have relevance for all time.  This was the first message recorded after Isaiah’s call that rocks our world. 

We wake up grateful each day that “God with Us” came and changed history, government, and people’s ability to have a relationship with the Father. It was a great promise for the king and for all of us who know and trust God. He alone will complete us and restore us to the eternal folks we are to become. 

God Bless You


Then the Lord said to Isaiah, “Go out, you and your son Shear-Jashub,[b] to meet Ahaz at the end of the aqueduct of the Upper Pool, on the road to the Launderer’s Field. Say to him, ‘Be careful, keep calm and don’t be afraid. Do not lose heart because of these two smoldering stubs of firewood—because of the fierce anger of Rezin and Aram and of the son of Remaliah. Aram, Ephraim and Remaliah’s son have plotted your ruin, saying, “Let us invade Judah; let us tear it apart and divide it among ourselves and make the son of Tabeel king over it.” Yet this is what the Sovereign Lord says:

“‘It will not take place,
    it will not happen,
for the head of Aram is Damascus,
    and the head of Damascus is only Rezin.
Within sixty-five years
    Ephraim will be too shattered to be a people.
The head of Ephraim is Samaria,
    and the head of Samaria is only Remaliah’s son.
If you do not stand firm in your faith,
    you will not stand at all.’”

10 Again the Lord spoke to Ahaz, 11 “Ask the Lord your God for a sign, whether in the deepest depths or in the highest heights.”

12 But Ahaz said, “I will not ask; I will not put the Lord to the test.”

13 Then Isaiah said, “Hear now, you house of David! Is it not enough to try the patience of humans? Will you try the patience of my God also? 14 Therefore the Lord himself will give you[c] a sign: The virgin[d] will conceive and give birth to a son, and[e] will call him Immanuel.[f] 15 He will be eating curds and honey when he knows enough to reject the wrong and choose the right, 16 for before the boy knows enough to reject the wrong and choose the right, the land of the two kings you dread will be laid waste. 17 The Lord will bring on you and on your people and on the house of your father a time unlike any since Ephraim broke away from Judah—he will bring the king of Assyria.”