Isaiah 36-39 A History Break

The Book of Isaiah stops and turns from prophetic to the historical.

It is amazing how brash the Godless can be.  The Assyrian Empire Had grown quite well. It’s King, Sennacherib, certainly thought himself invincible.  As he sent 180,000 troops to surround and capture Jerusalem, he assumed it would be a simple process.  His field commander approached the walls of Jerusalem and made the king’s announcement.  “Give it up…you do not stand a chance. Don’t listen to your king, he is deluded. If you think I am afraid of Him OR HIS GOD, you are wrong.  I am not afraid of the gods of my enemies; I have whipped them all.

Scripture reminds us repeatedly that men’s arrogance usually become the basis of their demise.  Here the Assyrian King placed way too much to confidence in his power and his men.  He laughed at Hezekiah’s promise to the people.  What he was about to learn, however, is that you can never underestimate the power of God.  What makes our Lord different from the rest of the world’s gods is that he is real.  How real? Well looking at the results–Sennacherib would say very real. So would the leaders of Egypt, Moab, Amelik, Midian, Sodom, Gomorrah, Babylon, Greece, Rome, and the list goes on.

I am a strong believer in the power of God. It has carried me through a very challenging journey. He has taught me repeatedly that it is our Lord that controls the lives of men. Our control is an illusion. On this very day as a category 4 hurricane has hit Texas and Louisiana, we are all reminded how quickly things can change.  Through all circumstance, we must seek the Lord and trust Him to carry us through. It will never be like we think, but it will always be amazing.  Help me Lord to trust You through thick and thin. Also, help me not to believe the lies of the world but, cling to the truth of your greatness.

God Bless You


36

The field commander said to them, “Tell Hezekiah:

“‘This is what the great king, the king of Assyria, says: On what are you basing this confidence of yours? You say you have counsel and might for war—but you speak only empty words. On whom are you depending, that you rebel against me? Look, I know you are depending on Egypt, that splintered reed of a staff, which pierces the hand of anyone who leans on it! Such is Pharaoh king of Egypt to all who depend on him. But if you say to me, “We are depending on the Lord our God”—isn’t he the one whose high places and altars Hezekiah removed, saying to Judah and Jerusalem, “You must worship before this altar”?

“‘Come now, make a bargain with my master, the king of Assyria: I will give you two thousand horses—if you can put riders on them! How then can you repulse one officer of the least of my master’s officials, even though you are depending on Egypt for chariots and horsemen[a]10 Furthermore, have I come to attack and destroy this land without the Lord? The Lord himself told me to march against this country and destroy it.’”

11 Then Eliakim, Shebna and Joah said to the field commander, “Please speak to your servants in Aramaic, since we understand it. Don’t speak to us in Hebrew in the hearing of the people on the wall.”

12 But the commander replied, “Was it only to your master and you that my master sent me to say these things, and not to the people sitting on the wall—who, like you, will have to eat their own excrement and drink their own urine?”

13 Then the commander stood and called out in Hebrew, “Hear the words of the great king, the king of Assyria! 14 This is what the king says: Do not let Hezekiah deceive you. He cannot deliver you! 15 Do not let Hezekiah persuade you to trust in the Lord when he says, ‘The Lord will surely deliver us; this city will not be given into the hand of the king of Assyria.’

16 “Do not listen to Hezekiah. This is what the king of Assyria says: Make peace with me and come out to me. Then each of you will eat fruit from your own vine and fig tree and drink water from your own cistern, 17 until I come and take you to a land like your own—a land of grain and new wine, a land of bread and vineyards.

18 “Do not let Hezekiah mislead you when he says, ‘The Lord will deliver us.’ Have the gods of any nations ever delivered their lands from the hand of the king of Assyria? 19 Where are the gods of Hamath and Arpad? Where are the gods of Sepharvaim? Have they rescued Samaria from my hand? 20 Who of all the gods of these countries have been able to save their lands from me? How then can the Lord deliver Jerusalem from my hand?”

21 But the people remained silent and said nothing in reply, because the king had commanded, “Do not answer him.”

Best laid Plans-2 Samuel 18 part 1

Absalom was clearly in control, his father was on the run, the people of Israel beginning to accept the change of Kings—but, then God had a different plan.  Absalom became trapped by his own vanity and exposed to death because of his own carelessness.  As he hung by his hair from a tree, I am sure he thought this cannot be happening to me—my hair…really?

Our best plans often fail to account for either God’s direction or unforeseen circumstance. When we are hit with the unexpected, like Absalom we are left hanging in awe and disgust exposed to the enemy unprotected and helpless.  That is why we must seek the Lord’s plan and follow his lead.  We will often wonder why God’s plan is what it is, but, when we follow him he protects and provides for us in a manner we would never believe.  David was defeated and on the run—then at a moment’s notice the battle was over and he was restored. Psalms 23 says, “Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death—I will fear no evil, for you are with me.” Thanks for being with me Lord.

God Bless You

Now Absalom happened to meet David’s men. He was riding his mule, and as the mule went under the thick branches of a large oak, Absalom’s hair got caught in the tree. He was left hanging in midair, while the mule he was riding kept on going.

10 When one of the men saw what had happened, he told Joab, “I just saw Absalom hanging in an oak tree.”

11 Joab said to the man who had told him this, “What! You saw him? Why didn’t you strike him to the ground right there? Then I would have had to give you ten shekels[b] of silver and a warrior’s belt.”

12 But the man replied, “Even if a thousand shekels[c] were weighed out into my hands, I would not lay a hand on the king’s son. In our hearing the king commanded you and Abishai and Ittai, ‘Protect the young man Absalom for my sake.[d]13 And if I had put my life in jeopardy[e]—and nothing is hidden from the king—you would have kept your distance from me.”

14 Joab said, “I’m not going to wait like this for you.” So he took three javelins in his hand and plunged them into Absalom’s heart while Absalom was still alive in