I Samuel 26 Part 2–David Wins to Fight Another Day

In the grand scheme of things, it was a good day for team David.  God had once again handed Saul over to David, but, David spared Saul. David knew it was not his job to take vengeance upon Saul–that was God’s job. So Saul and David had a very open and frank conversation in which Saul admitted his sin and promised to leave David in peace.  The problem was David had heard it all before.  So, as he returned Saul’s spear and chastised Saul’s men, David knew he had won another battle, but, the war was ongoing.  For David, that prospect must have been maddening.  Still, his faith in God and God’s plan carried him through another difficult day.
 
In our lives, sometimes it seems like God has solved the problem and as we move forward we can point to his amazing protection and provision.  Still, the battle rages and we rise to face a new day and a new set of struggles.  In the midst of the struggle, we have to cling to the little victories.  when the enemy attacks or life throws the next curveball, those victories give us the hope to continue to move forward.  It is acceptable to become discouraged when things seem hopeless and out of reach–but, if we will focus upon God and his leadership, rather than on the circumstance before us, the Lord will carry us through.  David continued to move forward–so should we!
 
God Bless You

Saul recognized David’s voice and said, “Is that your voice, David my son?”

David replied, “Yes it is, my lord the king.” 18 And he added, “Why is my lord pursuing his servant? What have I done, and what wrong am I guilty of? 19 Now let my lord the king listen to his servant’s words. If the Lord has incited you against me, then may he accept an offering. If, however, people have done it, may they be cursed before the Lord! They have driven me today from my share in the Lord’s inheritance and have said, ‘Go, serve other gods.’ 20 Now do not let my blood fall to the ground far from the presence of the Lord. The king of Israel has come out to look for a flea—as one hunts a partridge in the mountains.”

21 Then Saul said, “I have sinned. Come back, David my son. Because you considered my life precious today, I will not try to harm you again. Surely I have acted like a fool and have been terribly wrong.”

22 “Here is the king’s spear,” David answered. “Let one of your young men come over and get it. 23 The Lord rewards everyone for their righteousness and faithfulness. The Lord delivered you into my hands today, but I would not lay a hand on the Lord’s anointed. 24 As surely as I valued your life today, so may the Lord value my life and deliver me from all trouble.”

25 Then Saul said to David, “May you be blessed, David my son; you will do great things and surely triumph.”

So David went on his way, and Saul returned home

I Samuel 23 Part 2–A Mountain Between Us

David was learning to fully rely on God.  He was seeking God in every step. He was seeing how little trust could be put into men and how very precarious life was.  In the midst of that, however, God continued to protect, prepare and provide for David and his 600 men.  On this day, David was hiding in the desert and among the forests.  Saul had no shortage of sycophants that were glad to turn David over to Saul.  Jonathan, however, was still a loyal friend to David and he made a covenant to support David as King and remain loyal. 
 
Saul was closing in, however, and on this day, He had tracked David so close that they were on opposite sides of a mountain.  Saul had done a great job of tracking David down and now as he closed in nothing could stop him…well almost nothing! Just as he had David cornered, the Philistines attacked the Land. Saul had to leave and respond to the attack. What a coincidence, God even used the enemies of Israel to save His anointed king.
 
We never know what God’s plan will include for our lives.  In great and in difficult times, God is always in control of His plan for our lives.  There are days when we simply feel trapped and see no way to continue.  In those moments, God reminds us that He loves us and will not forsake us.  He promised in Romans 8, “All things work together for Good for those that love God and are called according to his purpose.” Romans 8:28.  We, like David, must fully rely upon God. He will deliver us in ways we would never expect–but should always know are from Him.  Our enemies may be clever, but God is greater! 
 
God Bless You

So David and his men, about six hundred in number, left Keilah and kept moving from place to place. When Saul was told that David had escaped from Keilah, he did not go there.

14 David stayed in the wilderness strongholds and in the hills of the Desert of Ziph. Day after day Saul searched for him, but God did not give David into his hands.

15 While David was at Horesh in the Desert of Ziph, he learned that[a] Saul had come out to take his life. 16 And Saul’s son Jonathan went to David at Horesh and helped him find strength in God. 17 “Don’t be afraid,” he said. “My father Saul will not lay a hand on you. You will be king over Israel, and I will be second to you. Even my father Saul knows this.” 18 The two of them made a covenant before the Lord. Then Jonathan went home, but David remained at Horesh.

19 The Ziphites went up to Saul at Gibeah and said, “Is not David hiding among us in the strongholds at Horesh, on the hill of Hakilah, south of Jeshimon? 20 Now, Your Majesty, come down whenever it pleases you to do so, and we will be responsible for giving him into your hands.”

21 Saul replied, “The Lord bless you for your concern for me. 22 Go and get more information. Find out where David usually goes and who has seen him there. They tell me he is very crafty.23 Find out about all the hiding places he uses and come back to me with definite information. Then I will go with you; if he is in the area, I will track him down among all the clans of Judah.”

24 So they set out and went to Ziph ahead of Saul. Now David and his men were in the Desert of Maon, in the Arabah south of Jeshimon. 25 Saul and his men began the search, and when David was told about it, he went down to the rock and stayed in the Desert of Maon. When Saul heard this, he went into the Desert of Maon in pursuit of David.

26 Saul was going along one side of the mountain, and David and his men were on the other side, hurrying to get away from Saul. As Saul and his forces were closing in on David and his men to capture them, 27 a messenger came to Saul, saying, “Come quickly! The Philistines are raiding the land.” 28 Then Saul broke off his pursuit of David and went to meet the Philistines. That is why they call this place Sela Hammahlekoth.[b] 29 And David went up from there and lived in the strongholds of En Gedi.[c]

I Samuel 22 part 1–David on the Run

With nothing in hand and nowhere to go, David headed into the land of Israel’s enemies. 1st David escaped to the King of Gath–(Goliath the Giant from Gath).  He hid out in Gath for a period, knowing Saul would not hunt him there.  Next, he headed to Moab–the place where Saul first made his name by wiping out several people.  David tried his best to go where he would not be attacked and where spies would not chase back to Saul and get him captured.  One can imagine the humbling experience that David faced standing before the leaders of lands he helped to defeat.
 
The good news was that as he was on the run, he was beginning to gather a group of men to command. It was a ragtag crew, but they would be what he needed as he faced the days ahead.  One can be sure as David started this phase of the journey, it looked nothing like what he would have ever hoped or dreamed.
 
In our journey, so many of the choices we make and directions we are pulled seem nothing like we expected in our youth.  It drives us crazy, it tests our faith and it slowly refines us into the people God calls us to be.  There is no easy way to become your best. It requires discipline, it requires training and it requires adversity, spiritual warfare and a long term (eternal) vision of life.  David would never have signed up for the anointing as king if he had known what God was going to take him through to be the greatest king Israel ever knew. He did, however, face each day, each trial and each disappointment fully relying upon God. Like David, we must look beyond what is and reach for what God has planned. We must remain grateful, humble and faithful no matter how difficult the journey becomes.  Help me, Lord to remain faithful in trials, grateful in blessings and humble in submission to Your lead!   
 
God Bless You

That day David fled from Saul and went to Achish king of Gath. 11 But the servants of Achish said to him, “Isn’t this David, the king of the land? Isn’t he the one they sing about in their dances:

“‘Saul has slain his thousands,
and David his tens of thousands’?”

12 David took these words to heart and was very much afraid of Achish king of Gath. 13 So he pretended to be insane in their presence; and while he was in their hands he acted like a madman, making marks on the doors of the gate and letting saliva run down his beard.

14 Achish said to his servants, “Look at the man! He is insane! Why bring him to me? 15 Am I so short of madmen that you have to bring this fellow here to carry on like this in front of me? Must this man come into my house?”…

David left Gath and escaped to the cave of Adullam. When his brothers and his father’s household heard about it, they went down to him there. All those who were in distress or in debt or discontented gathered around him, and he became their commander. About four hundred men were with him.

From there David went to Mizpah in Moab and said to the king of Moab, “Would you let my father and mother come and stay with you until I learn what God will do for me?” So he left them with the king of Moab, and they stayed with him as long as David was in the stronghold.

But the prophet Gad said to David, “Do not stay in the stronghold. Go into the land of Judah.” So David left and went to the forest of Hereth.

I Samuel 20 Part 1–Great Friends

In the midst of Saul’s mission to kill his son-in-law, David, Jonathan, Saul’s son and heir to his throne, still was David’s best friend. Jonathan had no idea of his father’s hatred of David.  David had been loyal to the kingdom and to his father.  So when David approached Jonathan to ask the reason for Saul’s wrath, Jonathan was truly surprised and skeptical.  Saul and Jonathan were close. They shared everything. Saul was preparing the kingdom for Jonathan and would never make a move like that without letting Jonathan know…would he?
 
Saul knew Jonathan and David were dear friends. Saul did not want to tell his son of the plan. Saul knew what he was doing was wrong, and he knew Jonathan would side with David rather than with Saul–and Saul did not want to face that. What Saul did not know was that God established the covenant between Jonathan and David. No matter what Saul had in mind, God would not allow Jonathan to be a part of it.  The consequence of Saul’s rejection of God would not harm the covenant between these great friends.
 
God kindly puts great friends in our lives.  We pour our hearts and lives into those friends. Those are the folks that see us at our best and worst but love us just the same.  It is those friends we look to and draw upon when we are seeking honest feedback, heartfelt prayer, and continued life support. It is those friends to whom we are available 24/7-365. We would never question their need, we would never give up on them.  I thank my dear friends for their years of loyalty. I would be long dead if not for you. I hope that I have been a Jonathan in your lives; as you certainly been so in mine.  Friendship is a precious treasure. David knew it and so do we.  Let us never take for granted those friends God has supplied.
 
God Bless You

Then David fled from Naioth at Ramah and went to Jonathan and asked, “What have I done? What is my crime? How have I wronged your father, that he is trying to kill me?”

“Never!” Jonathan replied. “You are not going to die! Look, my father doesn’t do anything, great or small, without letting me know. Why would he hide this from me? It isn’t so!”

But David took an oath and said, “Your father knows very well that I have found favor in your eyes, and he has said to himself, ‘Jonathan must not know this or he will be grieved.’ Yet as surely as the Lord lives and as you live, there is only a step between me and death.”

Jonathan said to David, “Whatever you want me to do, I’ll do for you.”

So David said, “Look, tomorrow is the New Moon feast, and I am supposed to dine with the king; but let me go and hide in the field until the evening of the day after tomorrow. If your father misses me at all, tell him, ‘David earnestly asked my permission to hurry to Bethlehem,his hometown, because an annual sacrifice is being made there for his whole clan.’ If he says, ‘Very well,’ then your servant is safe. But if he loses his temper, you can be sure that he is determined to harm me. As for you, show kindness to your servant, for you have brought him into a covenant with you before the Lord. If I am guilty, then kill me yourself! Why hand me over to your father?”

“Never!” Jonathan said. “If I had the least inkling that my father was determined to harm you, wouldn’t I tell you?”

10 David asked, “Who will tell me if your father answers you harshly?”

1 Samuel 18 Part 1–David’s Adventure Begins

There is an inherent danger that comes from following the Lord.  David had just followed God’s lead and killed the giant Goliath. His victory saved Israel and allowed the nation to regain its respect.  The king, Saul, should have been overjoyed–but, that was not the case.  Saul knew that God had abandoned him as king.  So, as Saul grew older, he also knew God was preparing his replacement. So when this young man, David, rose from nowhere to become the hero of Israel, Saul became fearful and jealous.
 
Jonathan, however, was thrilled to see David rise. Jonathan never lost sight of God being in charge of the kingdom.  Jonathan, the heir to the throne, became David’s best friend. So as Saul watched–he saw David taking everything he had built away from him. Saul became increasingly suspicious and jealous. David was becoming public enemy number 1 to Saul. There was nothing David could do–He was loyal to both Saul and to Israel. David played the Lyre to ease Saul’s torment. David stayed at Saul’s side–even at the risk of his own life.
 
Following God’s lead is never easy–Saul was simply unable to do it. David was beginning to find that despite his faithfulness to God, he was in a spiritual war that would be much more difficult than any battle with a giant. In our lives, the same holds true–we often find that following the Lord is difficult. It is far easier to do what we want–rather than trust God and allow Him to lead. What is more, when we do allow God to lead, the enemy will throw everything he has at us to try to neutralize our impact on others and to try to make us live a life independent of God. 
 
We, like David, must focus on God. We must gratefully walk the path laid out for us. What we will see, over time, is that God’s path is the only sustainable path to take. We will struggle, we will fail, and we will doubt ourselves and God in the process. When we look back through our lives, however, we will see that God’s plan was right and His leadership prepared us for the battles and victories we were able to experience.  David’s son–Solomon, said it best, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart. Do not lean on your own understanding. Acknowledge God in all your ways–and HE, God, will make your path straight!” Proverbs 3:5-6
 
God Bless You

After David had finished talking with Saul, Jonathan became one in spirit with David, and he loved him as himself. From that day Saul kept David with him and did not let him return home to his family. And Jonathan made a covenant with David because he loved him as himself. Jonathan took off the robe he was wearing and gave it to David, along with his tunic, and even his sword, his bow and his belt.

Whatever mission Saul sent him on, David was so successful that Saul gave him a high rank in the army. This pleased all the troops, and Saul’s officers as well.

When the men were returning home after David had killed the Philistine, the women came out from all the towns of Israel to meet King Saul with singing and dancing, with joyful songs and with timbrels and lyres. As they danced, they sang:

“Saul has slain his thousands,
and David his tens of thousands.”

Saul was very angry; this refrain displeased him greatly. “They have credited David with tens of thousands,” he thought, “but me with only thousands. What more can he get but the kingdom?” And from that time on Saul kept a close eye on David.

10 The next day an evil[a] spirit from God came forcefully on Saul. He was prophesying in his house, while David was playing the lyre, as he usually did. Saul had a spear in his hand 11 and he hurled it, saying to himself, “I’ll pin David to the wall.” But David eluded him twice.

I Samuel 17 Part 1–Facing the Giants

The people in Israel were in the midst of regaining their standing as a nation. Saul, their king had been making a name for himself by attacking the Philistine outposts. The battles had gone back and forth–but on this day, Israel had a big problem. His name was Goliath he was 9’6″ and armed to the teeth.  He stepped out to the battle lines and made a challenge. Send anyone from the Israelite army to face Goliath and winner takes all.  From Goliath’s standpoint, there was no one that was nearly close to a match of size or strength.  He neither feared God or men.
 
Across the valley, the mighty army of Israel sat in paralyzing fear.  Their King, Saul had rejected God’s leadership.  He no longer heard from God or trusted God to battle on Israel’s behalf.  So when a mighty warrior almost twice as large challenged them–rather than looking to God; they looked hopelessly at each other. What do we do now?  Israel had become a mighty nation by looking to God for direction and seeking His leadership in war and peace.  Now, since they no longer had God’s direction, they wandered aimlessly and fearfully through the battle.  Make no mistake, God still cared for His people, but the Lord was unwilling to bless a king who rejected Him and His leadership.
 
Israel’s problem was huge–but it was not the giant. Israel’s problem was chasing other gods.  Some had names like idols–Rah. Baal, Asherah. Other God’s were not named–power, riches, lust, and rage. Israel had simply lost sight of the God that freed them, protected them, provided for them and prepared them to take their place as a mighty nation. Never-the-less, God had a plan.  God would, as he always does, bring a warrior like none other.  When he was done, the warrior would make clear that it was God that would battle Israel’s enemies, and God would make Israel victorious.
 
In our lives, we, like Israel, get easily distracted by other gods.  Some have names–Hollywood, sports, politics. Others are unnamed like stress, finances, power, or lust. Still, when we lose sight of God, we begin to be overtaken by fear and confusion.  Our problems seem to be gigantic and armed to the teeth–but, as we learn, they are not the giants we think we see. Instead, it is our lack of submission to God as our Lord. When we humble ourselves, confess our sin and resubmit to God’s leadership; then the Lord himself will battle the giants we face. He will be victorious and He will get the credit. The beauty is that, when God takes the credit–everybody wins.
 
God Bless You

Now the Philistines gathered their forces for war and assembled at Sokoh in Judah. They pitched camp at Ephes Dammim, between Sokoh and Azekah. Saul and the Israelites assembled and camped in the Valley of Elah and drew up their battle line to meet the Philistines. The Philistines occupied one hill and the Israelites another, with the valley between them.

A champion named Goliath, who was from Gath, came out of the Philistine camp. His height was six cubits and a span.[a] He had a bronze helmet on his head and wore a coat of scale armor of bronze weighing five thousand shekels[b]on his legs he wore bronze greaves, and a bronze javelin was slung on his back. His spear shaft was like a weaver’s rod, and its iron point weighed six hundred shekels.[c] His shield bearer went ahead of him.

Goliath stood and shouted to the ranks of Israel, “Why do you come out and line up for battle? Am I not a Philistine, and are you not the servants of Saul? Choose a man and have him come down to me. If he is able to fight and kill me, we will become your subjects; but if I overcome him and kill him, you will become our subjects and serve us.” 10 Then the Philistine said, “This day I defy the armies of Israel! Give me a man and let us fight each other.” 11 On hearing the Philistine’s words, Saul and all the Israelites were dismayed and terrified.

1 Samuel 15 Part 2–Enough, You are Done!

Not since the time of Noah, had God regretted something so much as he regretted making Saul king of Israel.  Samuel knew that Saul had destroyed his opportunity to be the leader of the people.  He prayed all night to try to intercede, but God said enough! It was so much more than simply not carrying out God’s command.  The command to completely wipe out a group was extreme–but, to understand the wickedness and abuse that the Amalekites caused; well, it was a horrible abomination of murder, perversion, and evil. God wanted all traces of them gone.
 
The bigger issue, however, was that Saul had decided that his name and reputation was more important than serving God and leading God’s people.  Even after this event, Samuel had to track Saul down to where he was building a monument to himself.  Saul was obsessed with being in charge–just like every other king.  God simply had had enough.  So, God sent Samuel to give Saul his notice–“You are Done!” No more excuses and no more chances–Now, God will pick his kind of king.  The irony has always been and is–those that serve God humbly and gratefully are exalted well beyond their wildest dreams. Those that try to usurp God’s authority crumble in shame, obscurity, and futility.
 
In our lives, we need to listen to the Lord and follow His lead.  It will mean a life of purpose, peace, and joy.  There will be trials, temptation, and difficulty–THAT IS LIFE! But God will provide us with an amazing journey here, and an eternity of blessing for our allegiance and faith.  We need to seek Him, as we do, the Lord will provide for us. He loves us and wants to grant us a life of blessing. God will, however, step back and allow us to destroy our lives if we feel compelled to compete for control.  We need to pray that we do not live a life that causes Him to regret His choosing us as His own!
 
God Bless You

Then the word of the Lord came to Samuel: 11 “I regret that I have made Saul king because he has turned away from me and has not carried out my instructions.” Samuel was angry, and he cried out to the Lord all that night.

12 Early in the morning Samuel got up and went to meet Saul, but he was told, “Saul has gone to Carmel. There he has set up a monument in his own honor and has turned and gone on down to Gilgal.”

13 When Samuel reached him, Saul said, “The Lord bless you! I have carried out the Lord’s instructions.”

14 But Samuel said, “What then is this bleating of sheep in my ears? What is this lowing of cattle that I hear?”

“Enough!” Samuel said to Saul. “Let me tell you what the Lord said to me last night.”…

22 But Samuel replied:

“Does the Lord delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices
as much as in obeying the Lord?
To obey is better than sacrifice,
and to heed is better than the fat of rams.
23 For rebellion is like the sin of divination,
and arrogance like the evil of idolatry.
Because you have rejected the word of the Lord,
he has rejected you as king.”

24 Then Saul said to Samuel, “I have sinned. I violated the Lord’s command and your instructions. I was afraid of the men and so I gave in to them. 25 Now I beg you, forgive my sin and come back with me, so that I may worship the Lord.”

26 But Samuel said to him, “I will not go back with you. You have rejected the word of the Lord, and the Lord has rejected you as king over Israel!”

27 As Samuel turned to leave, Saul caught hold of the hem of his robe, and it tore. 28 Samuel said to him, “The Lord has torn the kingdom of Israel from you today and has given it to one of your neighbors—to one better than you. 29 He who is the Glory of Israel does not lie or change his mind; for he is not a human being, that he should change his mind.”

30 Saul replied, “I have sinned. But please honor me before the elders of my people and before Israel; come back with me, so that I may worship the Lord your God.” 31 So Samuel went back with Saul, and Saul worshiped the Lord.

32 Then Samuel said, “Bring me Agag king of the Amalekites.”

Agag came to him in chains.[c] And he thought, “Surely the bitterness of death is past.”

33 But Samuel said,