Luke 24 Part 2–The Walk to Emmaus

Jesus was back! He had suffered and died for our sins. But just as the prophets had predicted, He rose on the third day.  News was starting to spread of the crucifixion of the Lord. Two men were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus. During the walk, Jesus joined them.  the Lord acted as though He had not heard the news.  The men explained the week’s events and the furor those events caused.  Then Jesus spent the journey telling the men the prophetic signs and how the father let people know what was to come.

Jesus then stayed and joined them for dinner and when the Lord had broken bread and gave it to them, He revealed Himself and promptly disappeared.  They were amazed, informed, and now ready to face whatever and tell the world that Jesus was alive.  The men ran to the eleven and told them what had happened, all that Jesus said, and His breaking bread.  The eleven were amazed. Once again as amazing as it was, it was only the beginning.

Jesus’ resurrection changed the course of History. But at its beginning, those whom God planned to use, needed to see He was real, and His resurrection was also real. In the days that followed, Jesus would appear to more than 500 folks. I Corinthians 15:6. Jesus then ascended and sent His Holy Spirit in His place.  His Spirit indwells us and reminds us that He is with us, moment by moment.  If we will walk by faith, as the men did that day, we will see Jesus revealed in our lives.  That will be the most amazing journey of all.

God Bless You


13 That very day two of them were going to a village named Emmaus, about seven miles[a] from Jerusalem, 14 and they were talking with each other about all these things that had happened. 15 While they were talking and discussing together, Jesus himself drew near and went with them. 16 But their eyes were kept from recognizing him. 17 And he said to them, “What is this conversation that you are holding with each other as you walk?” And they stood still, looking sad. 18 Then one of them, named Cleopas, answered him, “Are you the only visitor to Jerusalem who does not know the things that have happened there in these days?” 19 And he said to them, “What things?” And they said to him, “Concerning Jesus of Nazareth, a man who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, 20 and how our chief priests and rulers delivered him up to be condemned to death and crucified him. 21 But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things happened. 22 Moreover, some women of our company amazed us. They were at the tomb early in the morning, 23 and when they did not find his body, they came back saying that they had even seen a vision of angels, who said that he was alive. 24 Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said, but him they did not see.” 25 And he said to them, “O foolish ones, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken! 26 Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer these things and enter into his glory?” 27 And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he interpreted to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself.

28 So they drew near to the village to which they were going. He acted as if he were going farther, 29 but they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, for it is toward evening and the day is now far spent.” So he went in to stay with them. 30 When he was at table with them, he took the bread and blessed and broke it and gave it to them. 31 And their eyes were opened, and they recognized him. And he vanished from their sight. 32 They said to each other, “Did not our hearts burn within us while he talked to us on the road, while he opened to us the Scriptures?” 33 And they rose that same hour and returned to Jerusalem. And they found the eleven and those who were with them gathered, 34 saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and has appeared to Simon!” 35 Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he was known to them in the breaking of the bread.

Luke 24–The Resurrection

It should have come as no surprise…Jesus rose from the dead just as He had promised. Oh, who are we kidding.  It was an amazing miracle that was almost impossible to believe, unless you had been there.  The women went to the tomb to prep the body for the long term stay in the grave; only to be met by angels reporting Jesus was no longer there. Then Peter ran to the tomb to find the graveclothes lying in a pile like yesterday’s laundry.  It had to be a mixture of terror and elation.  This Messiah had been killed.  they took the body down and placed it in the tomb merely days before.  Now, on this Sunday morning, when the week was to begin, Jesus was up and out.  In Luke’s account, we do not get the privilege of knowing guards had been stationed.  We do not read of the women seeing Jesus in the garden. (See Matthew 28).

Jesus’ resurrection was important and well documented. The faith of those that followed Jesus had been shaken to the core, but their love for Him and faith in His teachings led them back to seeing His completing His mission. As the writer of Hebrews reminds us, faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the confidence in things not seen. (Hebrews 11:1 ESV). That faith, while challenged, never left Jesus’ followers.  In fact, it would transform them from cowering refugees to world-changing evangelists and teachers. While they hid from punishment before, now they would face martyrdom and persecution until they were called Home.

We need to cling to the same faith that led his followers to the resurrection. Jesus would and did complete the mission.  That was truly not in question.  The entire history of the Bible confirmed that God accomplishes His plan in His time.  We must embrace the writer of Hebrews definition of faith, “confidence in things hoped for and assurance of things not seen”. When we do, we will better face the broken world and our personal trials and struggles.  Hebrews 11:6 says it best, “Without faith it is impossible to please God!” We cannot complete enough tasks, nor can we behave well enough to be redeemed by our own actions. 

We, like the disciples, must rely on the truth of His word to see His hand in our lives.  As we trust Him, Jesus will transform us into His image and prepare us for an eternity with our Lord.

God Bless You


On the first day of the week, very early in the morning, the women took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they entered, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus. While they were wondering about this, suddenly two men in clothes that gleamed like lightning stood beside them. In their fright the women bowed down with their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here; he has risen! Remember how he told you, while he was still with you in Galilee: ‘The Son of Man must be delivered over to the hands of sinners, be crucified and on the third day be raised again.’ ” Then they remembered his words.

When they came back from the tomb, they told all these things to the Eleven and to all the others. 10 It was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the others with them who told this to the apostles. 11 But they did not believe the women, because their words seemed to them like nonsense. 12 Peter, however, got up and ran to the tomb. Bending over, he saw the strips of linen lying by themselves, and he went away, wondering to himself what had happened.

Luke 22 Part 4–It is Friday, But Sunday is Coming

The scene of after the cross is a very sad part of Luke’s story.  It is that period where it seemed all was lost.  It is also the theme, however, of one of the most hopeful statements used by preachers and evangelists through the centuries.  “It is Friday, but Sunday is coming.”  In the lives of Jesus’ followers, seeing their Messiah dead on the cross undermined all the hope and beliefs they had built though the 3+ years of His ministry.  They were alone, afraid, and completely without hope.  The one on whom they had rested their hopes and belief was now dead.  The Jewish leaders were celebrating, Satan was gloating, and the Father now sat quiet.

We know the end of the story though! Jesus had previewed it several times for His guys.  He would arise on the third day! But those hours in between would be difficult and seem paralyzing.  In addition, even those that still had hope, faced the endless anticipation and fear of those next days.  What if He did not rise? What if this is all there is? It is a debilitating fear that leaves one empty and lost.  It is the same fear the Israelites had just before Moses came on the scene. It is the same fear they had as they marched around the walls of Jericho. It is the what the essence of faith entails.  Believing in what has not been seen–yet.

We still deal with that fear.  As we face these chaotic times, when all the principles and foundational beliefs we have are questioned, it is difficult to continue to believe and follow God. The great hope we have is the same hope that carried Israel out of Egypt, into the promised land, and back into a relationship with God our Father.  In that same spiritual sense, we can hear the old tent revivalist say, “It is Friday, but SUNDAY is COMING!”

God Bless You


50 Now there was a man named Joseph, a member of the Council, a good and upright man, 51 who had not consented to their decision and action. He came from the Judean town of Arimathea, and he himself was waiting for the kingdom of God. 52 Going to Pilate, he asked for Jesus’ body. 53 Then he took it down, wrapped it in linen cloth and placed it in a tomb cut in the rock, one in which no one had yet been laid. 54 It was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was about to begin.

55 The women who had come with Jesus from Galilee followed Joseph and saw the tomb and how his body was laid in it. 56 Then they went home and prepared spices and perfumes. But they rested on the Sabbath in obedience to the commandment.

Luke 22 Part 3–The End of the Beginning

Luke looks at Christ’s sacrifice from a great number of angles.  He looks at Pilate’s desperation as he longs to free Jesus, but, at the end of the day, caves to the pressure and hands the Messiah over for crucifixion. Next, Luke looks at the crowd.  The people that cheered only week before were hurling demands for their Hero’s death as if He had personally injured their families.  He showed the soldier’s disdain as they gathered a stranger to assist the Savior as his body had been beaten and bruised to the point of death.

Then Luke looks at the crowd, mourners for whom Jesus has pity. The thieves on either side of the cross.  The Jewish leaders and guards that mocked him with taunts and signs and finally Jesus’ followers that stayed back and watched with horror as their beloved teacher was being killed. Finally, we even see the grief of God as He makes the land dark and rips the temple vail.

In all of that, we also see Jesus. He is pleading for forgiveness of those that are mocking and killing Him. He is mourning for His mourners. He is granting life to the thief that recognized his innocence.  He is making one last effort in His role of human to be humane. 

Interestingly, Christ’s death would be the victory over the very ones that demanded it.  It would signify the end of sacrificial atonement of animals. It would destroy the theocracy then enjoyed by Jewish leaders of the day.  It would finally end Satan’s hold on the hearts of people. We who are yet sinners would now have the opportunity to have a personal relationship with God.

In life and in death, Jesus rose above the holds of humanity and demonstrated God’s unique love and unique character.  Then at the perfect hour, Jesus said it Himself–IT IS FINISHED! just as the modern Christian song says, that was the end of the beginning.

God Bless You


Wanting to release Jesus, Pilate appealed to them again. 21 But they kept shouting, “Crucify him! Crucify him!”

22 For the third time he spoke to them: “Why? What crime has this man committed? I have found in him no grounds for the death penalty. Therefore I will have him punished and then release him.”

23 But with loud shouts they insistently demanded that he be crucified, and their shouts prevailed. 24 So Pilate decided to grant their demand. 25 He released the man who had been thrown into prison for insurrection and murder, the one they asked for, and surrendered Jesus to their will.

The Crucifixion of Jesus

26 As the soldiers led him away, they seized Simon from Cyrene, who was on his way in from the country, and put the cross on him and made him carry it behind Jesus. 27 A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. 28 Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children. 29 For the time will come when you will say, ‘Blessed are the childless women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ 30 Then

“‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!”
    and to the hills, “Cover us!”’[b]

31 For if people do these things when the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?”

32 Two other men, both criminals, were also led out with him to be executed. 33 When they came to the place called the Skull, they crucified him there, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left. 34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.”[c] And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.

35 The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him. They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One.”

36 The soldiers also came up and mocked him. They offered him wine vinegar 37 and said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.”

38 There was a written notice above him, which read: this is the king of the jews.

39 One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: “Aren’t you the Messiah? Save yourself and us!”

40 But the other criminal rebuked him. “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence? 41 We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.”

42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.[d]

43 Jesus answered him, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.”

The Death of Jesus

44 It was now about noon, and darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon, 45 for the sun stopped shining. And the curtain of the temple was torn in two. 46 Jesus called out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.”[e] When he had said this, he breathed his last.

47 The centurion, seeing what had happened, praised God and said, “Surely this was a righteous man.” 48 When all the people who had gathered to witness this sight saw what took place, they beat their breasts and went away. 49 But all those who knew him, including the women who had followed him from Galilee, stood at a distance, watching these things.

Luke 23 Part 1–Jesus on Trial

As the time for our Savior’s death approached, it was apparent that the sacrifice was real.  Jesus stood before the Roman governor who had no reason to judge or punish Him.  Then He was sent to the Jewish king and that man simply wanted a magic show–Jesus would not humor him.  These leaders knew this was a man that had not committed any crime but was hated by the religious leaders–a true no-win situation for the two governing leaders.

Jesus also knew He had committed no crime.  He had simply met the needs of the folks with whom He came into contact.  He spoke the truth, in love about God’s love for people and the folks in Israel.  He called the religious leaders out for doing everything to honor themselves in the name of God. That was the point, God had tried sending priests and prophets to express His desire to redeem His people.  Those He sent were ridiculed and injured; even killed. Now, as in the parable of the landowner and tenants, God sent His Son to make peace and get on track with the tenants (Religious leaders).  They were now plotting His death so that they would not be accountable to the Landowner (God). Luke 20:19. Neither our Lord nor Father God was surprised.  The critical thing was that Jesus did know what had to happen and allowed these “Keystone Cops” to think they were completing a grand plan to rid themselves of a rival. 

Then and now, we are the beneficiaries of His willingness to give what no man could take without God’s help or consent.  As Paul reminded us in Romans 5:8, “God demonstrated His love for us in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” In this season when Easter is fast approaching, we need to reflect on the personal relationship we have with God, and we need to allow Him to be a part of all aspects of our lives.  We cannot simply acknowledge God’s sacrifice; we must allow it to change us and help us to become more like Him.

God Bless You


Then the whole assembly rose and led him off to Pilate. And they began to accuse him, saying, “We have found this man subverting our nation. He opposes payment of taxes to Caesar and claims to be Messiah, a king.”

So Pilate asked Jesus, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

“You have said so,” Jesus replied.

Then Pilate announced to the chief priests and the crowd, “I find no basis for a charge against this man.”

But they insisted, “He stirs up the people all over Judea by his teaching. He started in Galilee and has come all the way here.”

On hearing this, Pilate asked if the man was a Galilean. When he learned that Jesus was under Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who was also in Jerusalem at that time.

When Herod saw Jesus, he was greatly pleased, because for a long time he had been wanting to see him. From what he had heard about him, he hoped to see him perform a sign of some sort. He plied him with many questions, but Jesus gave him no answer. 10 The chief priests and the teachers of the law were standing there, vehemently accusing him. 11 Then Herod and his soldiers ridiculed and mocked him. Dressing him in an elegant robe, they sent him back to Pilate. 12 That day Herod and Pilate became friends—before this they had been enemies.

Luke 22 Final–The Trial…

It must have been surreal for Jesus to watch everything unfold.  He had seen this day since the dawn of time.  It is interesting to ponder which of the details that must have stuck out to our Lord.  Judas’ betrayal, Peter’s denial, the religious leaders stumbling over themselves as they tried to make a case against the Lord.  I am sure that the grief Peter bore as he looked into Jesus’ eyes after denying Him was overwhelming. Judas could not bear his shame, and so he committed suicide.

Meanwhile, the enemy and the Jewish leaders were having a ball.  Here, the one that had beaten them all now stood before the council on trial for His life. During the process, every punch, every slap, every curse thrown at Jesus, was done so for our redemption.  One can only imagine the pain and frustration Jesus set aside as those He came to save were mocking and preparing to kill Him. Still, Jesus faced the mob. He did not interfere with their kangaroo court.  He did, after all, write the law that they used as the basis for their mockery of justice.

His disciples were scattered, and now, all that transpired would happen according to the script that was written as Eve prepared the fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil.  The trial was not actually before the religious leaders.  The trial was, in fact, being played out on a heavenly stage. The finding was simply whether God would demonstrate His love for us–in that while we were yet sinners, would Christ die for us? Romans 5:8.

Praise God that He did in fact endure the next hours and day. His sacrifice freed us from the curse our sinful nature bound us to.  We can become new creatures by simply trusting the Lord. 2 Corinthians 5:17. What was to come made all that possible.  We can never understand the depth of love Jesus’ sacrifice embodied.  Our prayer needs not to be one for understanding, however. It simply needs to be one of acceptance of the gift, and submission to the amazing plan our Lord prepared and executed to redeem and restore us.

God Bless You


Then they seized him and led him away, bringing him into the high priest’s house, and Peter was following at a distance. 55 And when they had kindled a fire in the middle of the courtyard and sat down together, Peter sat down among them. 56 Then a servant girl, seeing him as he sat in the light and looking closely at him, said, “This man also was with him.” 57 But he denied it, saying, “Woman, I do not know him.” 58 And a little later someone else saw him and said, “You also are one of them.” But Peter said, “Man, I am not.” 59 And after an interval of about an hour still another insisted, saying, “Certainly this man also was with him, for he too is a Galilean.” 60 But Peter said, “Man, I do not know what you are talking about.” And immediately, while he was still speaking, the rooster crowed. 61 And the Lord turned and looked at Peter. And Peter remembered the saying of the Lord, how he had said to him, “Before the rooster crows today, you will deny me three times.” 62 And he went out and wept bitterly.

Jesus Is Mocked

63 Now the men who were holding Jesus in custody were mocking him as they beat him. 64 They also blindfolded him and kept asking him, “Prophesy! Who is it that struck you?” 65 And they said many other things against him, blaspheming him.

Jesus Before the Council

66 When day came, the assembly of the elders of the people gathered together, both chief priests and scribes. And they led him away to their council, and they said, 67 “If you are the Christ, tell us.” But he said to them, “If I tell you, you will not believe, 68 and if I ask you, you will not answer. 69 But from now on the Son of Man shall be seated at the right hand of the power of God.” 70 So they all said, “Are you the Son of God, then?” And he said to them, “You say that I am.” 71 Then they said, “What further testimony do we need? We have heard it ourselves from his own lips.”

Luke 19 Part 3–The Triumphal Entry to Holy Week

Luke begins the look at Holy week with Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem. This was the most difficult journey that the Lord embarked upon in His ministry.  Jesus knew every step in the playbook.  He had seen it since before the creation.  It is a very telling hint for us when Jesus sends His guys to retrieve the colt.  The detail of where to go and what to say; reminds us that this video had replayed many times in the Lord’s thoughts.  

Then, as Jesus started into the city, the crowds welcomed Him as a conquering hero.  We must not miss the irony of the colt.  Conquering heroes paraded in on beautiful chargers with banners waving and trumpets blaring.  Conversely, when a king came in peace, would he do so on a colt, non-descript.  Still, the crowds roared and pronounced Jesus’ arrival.  While His men basked in their celebrity, Jesus felt the anguish of His coming fate, and the fate of His chosen ones. Still, He proceeded into Jerusalem, knowing that He would soon complete His mission. Jesus was prepared suffer the pain, humiliation, and separation from the Father.

It is that sacrifice that redeemed us.  Jesus, as the old hymn reminds us, could have called 10,000 angels to stop the trial and crucifixion.  He did not.  In exchange, the Lord simply asks us to trust and follow Him.  Jesus knew all about our lives and all our issues even as the Father proclaimed, “Let there be Light!” We cannot shock or surprise the Lord.  We can, however, follow Him and experience peace and an abundant Life here on earth; as well as, an eternity with Him in Glory.  What a great gift, and what an amazing promise.

God Bless You


After Jesus had said this, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. As he approached Bethphage and Bethany at the hill called the Mount of Olives, he sent two of his disciples, saying to them, 30 “Go to the village ahead of you, and as you enter it, you will find a colt tied there, which no one has ever ridden. Untie it and bring it here. 31 If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ say, ‘The Lord needs it.’” Those who were sent ahead went and found it just as he had told them. As they were untying the colt, its owners asked them, “Why are you untying the colt?” They replied, “The Lord needs it.” They brought it to Jesus, threw their cloaks on the colt and put Jesus on it. As he went along, people spread their cloaks on the road. When he came near the place where the road goes down the Mount of Olives, the whole crowd of disciples began joyfully to praise God in loud voices for all the miracles they had seen: “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!” “Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to Jesus, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples!” 40 “I tell you,” he replied, “if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out.” As he approached Jerusalem and saw the city, he wept over it 42and said, “If you, even you, had only known on this day what would bring you peace—but now it is hidden from your eyes. 43 The days will come upon you when your enemies will build an embankment against you and encircle you and hem you in on every side. 44They will dash you to the ground, you and the children within your walls. They will not leave one stone on another, because you did not recognize the time of God’s coming to you.”

Luke 19 Part 2–Gifts and Talents

Luke continues to allow us to listen in while Jesus was doing the final preparation with His disciples.  In today’s lesson, Jesus speaks to the issue of using the gifts God has given you.  The parable of the Minas. or talents is a simple one.  The Master gives different servants different amounts and gifts and then leaves town.  While away, the different servants react.  Some put the minas to use, some hide the minas, and some reject the Master outright.  Upon the Master’s return, the Master blesses the ones that use the investment.  He strips the servant that hid the Master’s investment, and the Master destroyed the servants that rejected His gift.  This was not your typical “Happy ever after” story.

The parable was incredibly significant, both then and now.  God equips each of us with different and varied gifts and talents.  He has no interest in us trying to be something we are not.  So, then the Lord looks to us to use the gifts He has given us for the furtherance of the kingdom, and of ministry. For those that use the gifts and talents, the Lord will bless them and multiply their talent and their ministry.  Others will simply hide themselves and their talents.  Jesus said to those that hid their talent and ministry; He would strip them of those gifts and talents and give them to the faithful servants.  Finally, to the others who simply reject God and His gift of salvation and tools for ministry; Jesus says, “You will be destroyed.”

So, for the purposes of the Apostles, and our purpose; the message is simple, use your gifts and talents with intention and vigor.  As you do, God will multiply the blessing and the ministry. Even if you choose to fear God’s wrath, then do something to avert it. Do not simply hide the talents from others. Jesus said, “Seek first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things will be added to you.” Matthew 6:33.  

Finally, understand, God offers a gift of salvation and redemption for any whom will ask. Please, ask the Lord to forgive your sin, come into your life, and be a part.  He promises in Revelation 3:20, “Behold I stand at the door and knock.  If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and sup with them and they with me!”  It is a great promise.  He will meet us where we are and accept us sin and all.

God Bless You


11 While they were listening to this, he went on to tell them a parable, because he was near Jerusalem and the people thought that the kingdom of God was going to appear at once. 12 He said: “A man of noble birth went to a distant country to have himself appointed king and then to return. 13 So he called ten of his servants and gave them ten minas.[a] ‘Put this money to work,’ he said, ‘until I come back.’

14 “But his subjects hated him and sent a delegation after him to say, ‘We don’t want this man to be our king.’

15 “He was made king, however, and returned home. Then he sent for the servants to whom he had given the money, in order to find out what they had gained with it.

16 “The first one came and said, ‘Sir, your mina has earned ten more.’

17 “‘Well done, my good servant!’ his master replied. ‘Because you have been trustworthy in a very small matter, take charge of ten cities.’

18 “The second came and said, ‘Sir, your mina has earned five more.’

19 “His master answered, ‘You take charge of five cities.’

20 “Then another servant came and said, ‘Sir, here is your mina; I have kept it laid away in a piece of cloth. 21 I was afraid of you, because you are a hard man. You take out what you did not put in and reap what you did not sow.’

22 “His master replied, ‘I will judge you by your own words, you wicked servant! You knew, did you, that I am a hard man, taking out what I did not put in, and reaping what I did not sow? 23 Why then didn’t you put my money on deposit, so that when I came back, I could have collected it with interest?’

24 “Then he said to those standing by, ‘Take his mina away from him and give it to the one who has ten minas.’

25 “‘Sir,’ they said, ‘he already has ten!’

26 “He replied, ‘I tell you that to everyone who has, more will be given, but as for the one who has nothing, even what they have will be taken away. 27 But those enemies of mine who did not want me to be king over them—bring them here and kill them in front of me.’”

Luke 19 Part 1–Seeking and Saving that Which is Lost

The story of Zacchaeus has several great components.  First, we see the lost man’s desire to meet the Master.  Zacchaeus was one of the most hated and powerful men in his community.  As chief tax collector, Zacchaeus had the ear of the Romans and the wealth of the city.  Even with all that power and wealth, Zacchaeus was still empty.  He wanted to learn more about this Jesus that had changed so many lives. Sadly, he could not see Jesus over the crowd.  He had to climb a tree to catch a glimpse.  

Next, we see the perspective of the Lord.  As Jesus passed through, like the shepherd He saw the one sheep that was lost and called out to this man in the tree and told Zacchaeus he was the reason for Jesus being there that day.  It changed Zacchaeus’ Life.  In an instant, Zacchaeus became generous and sought to make amends to all he had wronged.  His heart was redeemed.  What a picture of the power of God. Jesus had truly sought and saved that which was lost.

Finally, there was the crowd.  They were incensed by Jesus’ choice of company that day.  In their minds, Zacchaeus was the least worthy person to be with Jesus. Still, after He met the Lord, Zacchaeus would become a benefactor and friend to those that despised him.  Sadly, the people that should embrace those that need Jesus, were the ones that cast Zacchaeus aside.

In our lives, we need to have Jesus’ heart and not the heart of the crowd.  Jesus saw Zacchaeus in the tree, and He knew Zacchaeus was the point of the journey.  The crowd only saw Zacchaeus sin.  We, as Jesus chosen, need also to seek and to save that which is lost.  We can never lose sight of our mission.  Many people search high and low for a way to be saved, but they cannot see over the crowd.  It is our job to reach out and bring them to Jesus. It is not our job to judge them.  

Finally, if You have tried to find peace through power, influence, money, or any other means, Like Zacchaeus, you will still be empty inside.  Jesus is uniquely suited to fill the void in your life.  Once you give your life to Him, you will be free from the void left in your heart by a world gone mad.  All Jesus asks is for you to accept His gift of salvation, and then trust the Lord to do a work in your heart–just like He did with Zacchaeus.

God Bless You

 Jesus entered Jericho and was passing through. A man was there by the name of Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector and was wealthy. He wanted to see who Jesus was, but because he was short, he could not see over the crowd. So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore-fig tree to see him, since Jesus was coming that way.

When Jesus reached the spot, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, come down immediately. I must stay at your house today.” So he came down at once and welcomed him gladly.

All the people saw this and began to mutter, “He has gone to be the guest of a sinner.”

But Zacchaeus stood up and said to the Lord, “Look, Lord! Here and now, I give half of my possessions to the poor, and if I have cheated anybody out of anything, I will pay back four times the amount.”

Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, because this man, too, is a son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.”

Luke 18 Final–The Surge

It is called the surge.  Critically ill patients will sometimes make a surge in recovery immediately before fading to their end.  In the Gospel, we see Jesus’ experience a surge as he enters into holy week with unprecedented popularity. Luke tells of His warning to the disciples.  He lays it out.  He would be turned over to the gentiles(Romans) to be beaten, taunted, spit upon and killed.  This is not the typical way one honors a King. The disciples must have been so confused.  Why would such a thing occur when everybody loved Jesus.  Crowds followed Him everywhere. He was healing, raising the dead, casting out demons! What was not to love.

Jesus knew what was about to transpire.  He had known the course of events since creation.   God told the animals after the flood that men were simply evil.  That definitely had not changed with time. Now, as the end of Jesus ministry was approaching, He was aware of how quickly men would turn on their Star and have Him disgraced and killed.  While it must have been a grueling time for the Lord, He knew it was the only way to restore the relationship between a Holy God and sinful men.  That was why the Lord was there.

The next days in the life of our Savior would define time, change history, and bring salvation to all that believed.  Our very spiritual life was purchased through the betrayal and death of this perfect Man.  As we look at Luke’s account of Christ and His ministry, we can never forget that this account was as amazing to Luke as it is to us.  We do not deserve such a great sacrifice, the grace, or the mercy Christ bestowed.  Still, we are the unconditional recipients of that gift; and, we should start each day–grateful for what the sacrifice of our Lord means for us now and forever.

God Bless You


31 Jesus took the Twelve aside and told them, “We are going up to Jerusalem, and everything that is written by the prophets about the Son of Man will be fulfilled. 32 He will be delivered over to the Gentiles. They will mock him, insult him and spit on him; 33 they will flog him and kill him. On the third day he will rise again.”

34 The disciples did not understand any of this. Its meaning was hidden from them, and they did not know what he was talking about.

A Blind Beggar Receives His Sight

35 As Jesus approached Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging. 36 When he heard the crowd going by, he asked what was happening. 37 They told him, “Jesus of Nazareth is passing by.”

38 He called out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

39 Those who led the way rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but he shouted all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

40 Jesus stopped and ordered the man to be brought to him. When he came near, Jesus asked him, 41 “What do you want me to do for you?”

“Lord, I want to see,” he replied.

42 Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has healed you.” 43 Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus, praising God. When all the people saw it, they also praised God.