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As one reads Ecclesiastes, there is a sense of frustration and futility. Solomon seems to be looking at a life of utter waste and sorrow.  Such a view is inaccurate.  Solomon was simply analyzing the world and its state; and determining how to find meaning in a meaningless proposition.  His answer–“be content.”  Each person has a role to play.  Some are wealthy, others are barely solvent.  Some labor under back breaking conditions, while others sit at a desk and barely lift a finger. As one observes others in the world, all other roles seem more attractive; when, in fact, each carries its burdens and unique set of problems.

Solomon grasped that whatever our role, as long one has food, shelter and clothes, they can have a good life.  He learned that it is what occupies our heart that brings us joy, not what we possess. In our lives, in this country, many of the nation’s poor have a great number of luxuries that others in the world lack.  But, until each of us, rich or poor, become content in our current circumstance; we will not be content in any other condition.  The key is to understand that we simply need food, clothing and shelter–beyond that, it is all a luxury.  We can be grateful for those luxuries we are given, but, we can never expect them to be a need.

God Bless You

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. 19 Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. 20 They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.