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They say all the world is a stage, and we are merely actors playing a role.  Solomon,the wisest man that ever lived–he seemed to agree with that analysis.  The book of Ecclesiastes is the straight talk from a man that God blessed in every way. Still, despite that, he managed to mess up his life.  1000 wives, 300+girlfriends, more money and stuff than could be imagined–and yet, at the end of his life, Solomon gave the best candid interview imaginable.  It was as if he was being questioned by Barbara Walters…Question one–Solomon, you have had a great reign as the King of Israel, so looking back over the last 40+ years how would you characterize your life?
 
Solomon knew that every thing that we do is simply meaningless.  Our labors, our possessions and our accomplishments, like the actor on the stage fade as the curtain closes.  The detail Solomon opens with is harrowing.  The sun rises and sets, generations come and go, the sea fills and drains and if that was it, well it is simply wearisome.  That is why, we as God’s chosen are called to be different.  We seek to leave a legacy of love and purpose with our family, friends and community–Something that is bigger than the role of “Person”.  Solomon, despite his real despair–needed to leave a legacy–something bigger than the role of King.  We see that legacy in the form of Proverbs and Ecclesiastes.  Each passage is an alarm, set to remind us that if we want to be more than just another line in the program–we must live to leave a legacy.
 
God Bless You  
 The words of the Teacher,[a] son of David, king in Jerusalem:

“Meaningless! Meaningless!”
    says the Teacher.
“Utterly meaningless!
    Everything is meaningless.”

What do people gain from all their labors
    at which they toil under the sun?
Generations come and generations go,
    but the earth remains forever.
The sun rises and the sun sets,
    and hurries back to where it rises.
The wind blows to the south
    and turns to the north;
round and round it goes,
    ever returning on its course.
All streams flow into the sea,
    yet the sea is never full.
To the place the streams come from,
    there they return again.
All things are wearisome,
    more than one can say.
The eye never has enough of seeing,
    nor the ear its fill of hearing.
What has been will be again,
    what has been done will be done again;
    there is nothing new under the sun.