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The Governor, Festus was the one that asked what everyone was thinking…”What are you nuts?”  Why would a perfectly successful Jewish leader, at what seemed the height of his career, turn rogue on his group and become public enemy number one in the religious circles?  The answer was simply that God called him to repentance, restoration and revolution.  Paul, the king of the rules, was to teach the world about a life justified by faith and covered in grace.  This was truly one of God’s huge ironies.  Still in the midst of his trial, it became clear to Agrippa and Festus that the trial was a sham and that Paul was wrongfully accused of sedition.  He was simply guilty of sharing his beliefs and being passionate about his mission–neither act was worthy of execution or even trial court.
 
The world still thinks we are nuts.  For the world, we are all like Paul.  We are counter-culture.  We Love God and others more than we love ourselves.  We choose to give ourselves over to the service of others, rather than, taking from others to meet our wants and desires.  In the godless person’s eyes, “that is crazy stuff!”  But, in our experience, the reality of God’s paradoxical nature makes perfect sense.  We know by faith he is in charge of meeting our needs, we are simply to trust and follow.  While we are following, he uses us to meet the needs of others in big and small ways.  From a kind word to paying someone’s electric bill, we are at his service throughout the journey.  As we serve, the amazing miracle of his desire to make our lives full of purpose and meaning–shines through.  We, like Paul see God’s hand and are blessed in the mist of the world’s persecution and disbelief. That is what makes it an amazing adventure!
 
God Bless You
That is why some Jews seized me in the temple courts and tried to kill me. 22 But God has helped me to this very day; so I stand here and testify to small and great alike. I am saying nothing beyond what the prophets and Moses said would happen— 23 that the Messiah would suffer and, as the first to rise from the dead, would bring the message of light to his own people and to the Gentiles.”24 At this point Festus interrupted Paul’s defense. “You are out of your mind, Paul!” he shouted. “Your great learning is driving you insane.”

25 “I am not insane, most excellent Festus,” Paul replied. “What I am saying is true and reasonable. 26 The king is familiar with these things, and I can speak freely to him. I am convinced that none of this has escaped his notice, because it was not done in a corner. 27 King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know you do.”

28 Then Agrippa said to Paul, “Do you think that in such a short time you can persuade me to be a Christian?”

29 Paul replied, “Short time or long—I pray to God that not only you but all who are listening to me today may become what I am, except for these chains.”

30 The king rose, and with him the governor and Bernice and those sitting with them. 31 After they left the room, they began saying to one another, “This man is not doing anything that deserves death or imprisonment.”

32 Agrippa said to Festus, “This man could have been set free if he had not appealed to Caesar.”