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Giving back—that is the answer of why the wisest, richest and most powerful leader of Israel took time out of his day to write the proverbs. To understand the proverbs, one must understand the author.  Solomon was the Son of David.  He was God’s pick for King.  When he became king—God met him directly, offered him anything he wanted as King–wealth, power, fame—Solomon told God, as a young king, he wanted wisdom.  God was thrilled.  God said, as you have asked for wisdom—I will make you the wisest king that has ever lived.  In addition, since you chose wisdom over fame, power and fortune, I will also give you all of those things. So it was—Solomon became the wisest, most powerful, most wealthy and most influential king of the nation of Israel.

Sadly, despite all that God had provided the king—like many of us—Solomon began to believe the hype.  He became proud of his wisdom, his wealth and his power.  He literally made his life an experiment.  He did everything that men do to find happiness.  He sought treasure-and accumulated more than he could ever spend—it left him empty.  He sought love—he had 1000 wives and 300 concubines—it left him lonely.  He sought world renown as the most prominent and wealthiest leader in the world—yet his power gave him nothing more than the kings before him. He dived head first into every sin imaginable—still he was unsatisfied.  At the end of his life, the “wonder king” realized all his ventures were nothing more than foolishness and his original plan as a boy king—to have and use God’s wisdom to lead justly and selflessly was the most amazing life of all.

It is from that place, that the wisest man of all time penned the proverbs.  He wrote them for his son—the one who would be king.  His hope was that he could help him to avoid the wasteful empty life Solomon made for himself.  While, the proverbs did not mold and save Rehoboam- his son and successor, it has shaped lives through the centuries and gives men some very practical life directing wisdom, that if followed, will unleash the power of a Godly king.

God Bless You

The proverbs of Solomon son of David, king of Israel:

for gaining wisdom and instruction;     for understanding words of insight; for receiving instruction in prudent behavior,     doing what is right and just and fair; for giving prudence to those who are simple,     knowledge and discretion to the young— let the wise listen and add to their learning,     and let the discerning get guidance— for understanding proverbs and parables,     the sayings and riddles of the wise.

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge,     but fools despise wisdom and instruction.