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Judah was all that was left of the Israelites. The 10 tribes had been scattered by the Assyrian King, and now the 2 tribes that made up Judah was about to be enslaved by the Babylonian empire. While God had been patient, the continued independence by the people of Judah—their worship of other gods and complete disregard for their heritage and faith pushed God to hand Judah over to the Babylonians to become their slaves. What a waste of a good liberation.

 The people of Judah were carted off to Babylon and the city of Jerusalem was destroyed. Babylon treated captives differently, however. Their plan was to assimilate their captives into Babylonian culture and remove the old culture from the people. Wisely, they took the best and brightest of the youth and set them apart to make them true Babylonian leaders.—So begins the story of Daniel.

 As a nation, we are struggling with the same issues. We have forsaken our heritage and have worked to eliminate God from our nation. While God has been patient, the anarchy and chaos that pervades our culture is a sign of him turning us over to the life we have chased. Incidentally, history has repeatedly shown us–that never ends well. As his children, we must pray for a revival. We need to understand the idea of this nation and return to its principles; like, the principles of freedom TO worship, NOT freedom FROM worship.

 We must return to the God of our founding fathers and follow him–if we ever hope to remain free. Otherwise, we will simply become a captive to someone that hates our God and our way of life. Join me in prayer for a revival for the Church and this great country.

 God Bless You

In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and besieged it. And the Lord delivered Jehoiakim king of Judah into his hand, along with some of the articles from the temple of God. These he carried off to the temple of his god in Babylonia[a] and put in the treasure house of his god.

Then the king ordered Ashpenaz, chief of his court officials, to bring into the king’s service some of the Israelites from the royal family and the nobility— young men without any physical defect, handsome, showing aptitude for every kind of learning, well informed, quick to understand, and qualified to serve in the king’s palace. He was to teach them the language and literature of the Babylonians.[b] The king assigned them a daily amount of food and wine from the king’s table. They were to be trained for three years, and after that they were to enter the king’s service.

Among those who were chosen were some from Judah: Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah. The chief official gave them new names: to Daniel, the name Belteshazzar; to Hananiah, Shadrach; to Mishael, Meshach; and to Azariah, Abednego.